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Word of the day: Laser Printing

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Static electricity is the principle behind laser printing which uses a revolving cylinder, a laser beam, fine powder toner, and heat to create images on paper. Black and white lasers (black toner) are relatively inexpensive and common in many homes and small offices. Color lasers are typically found in service bureaus and commercial printers and may be used to produce high-resolution color digital proofs. Adobe PostScript capabilities found in many laser printers make them popular with graphic designers and desktop ...

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Word of the day: Neck (Link)

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In typeface anatomy, the link is that small, usually curved stroke that connects the bowl and loop of a double-storey g.

Also Known As: neck, terminal

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Word of the day: Modern

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In typography, Modern is a style of typeface developed in the late 18th century that continued through much of the 19th century. Characterized by high contrast between thick and thin strokes and flat serifs, Modern fonts are harder to read than previous and later typestyles.

Some later variations of Modern include the Slab Serifs with bolder, square serifs (often considered a separate style altogether) and the related Clarendon style with less contrast and softer, rounded shapes.

Also Known As: Didone, New ...

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Word of the day: Leaders

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Those rows of dots that help lead the reader from one bit of information to another across a page are leaders. You’ll commonly find them used in a table of contents, an index, or a price list.

Leaders can be dots, dashes, little squares, or even solid lines. Create leaders using Leader Tabs in your word processing or page layout software.

Also Known As: dot leaders | leader tabs

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Word of the day: Kerning Pairs

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Kerning is the adjustment of space between pairs of letters to make them more visually appealing. Some type comes with kerning pairs — commonly kerned pairs of letters with the spacing already adjusted for best visual appearance so that manual kerning of headlines and subheads is unnecessary.

Not all software programs can access the kerning pairs found in some fonts. Other programs not only read the built-in kerning information, but can also edit the kerning pairs to change the kerning ...

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Word of the day: Justification

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Another term for alignment, justification is the aligning of the top, bottom, sides, or middle of text or graphic elements on a page. While text can be left- or right-justified, justified text typically refers to text that is aligned to both the left and right margins — also called fully-justified or full justification.

Full justification of text (fully justified alignment) can create uneven and sometimes unsightly white spaces and rivers of white space in the text. When ...

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Word of the day: Initial Caps

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Oversized letters at the start of some paragraphs are known as initial caps. The more common term is drop or dropped cap, although drop caps are just one style of initial cap. These enlarged letters may be set in the same type style as the accompanying text but are often a different, sometimes highly ornate, decorative letter. The purpose of initial caps is to draw attention to the text and draw the reader into the narrative. They serve as a ...

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Word of the day: Bold Type

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A typeface with thicker strokes than regular, roman text is called bold type. Bold is used for emphasis to make certain words and phrases stand out from surrounding text.

Although bold type can be created “on-the-fly” in software programs, true bold type is a distinctly drawn digital typeface that works as a companion to other non-bold fonts of the same family.

Pronunciation: [bohld]

Also Known As: boldface | heavy | black

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Word of the day: Agate

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A standard unit of measurement found primarily in newspaper publishing, an agate is approximately equal to 5 1/2 points or 1/14 of an inch or 1.814 millimeters.

The very small type used for statistical data in the sports and stock sections of a newspaper is agate type. Agate is also the unit of measure used to calculate a column inch in advertising.

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Word of the day: Gothic (Sans Serif)

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Type which does not have serifs — the little extra strokes found at the end of main vertical and horizontal strokes of some letterforms — are called sans serif (without serif). Within sans serif there are five main classifications: Grotesque, Neo-Grotesque, Geometric, Humanist, and Informal. Typefaces within each classification usually share similarities in stroke thickness, weight, and the shapes of certain letterforms.

Although there were some sans serif typefaces in the 1800s, the 1920’s Bauhaus design movement popularized the sans serif ...

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